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Stand out, Be kind

Say no to bullying

50% of teens worry about bullies

100% of parents worry about their teens being bullied

We’ve teamed up with The Diana Award Anti-Bullying Campaign to empower young people to tackle bullying in their schools and communities. Their Anti-Bullying Ambassadors Programme has already trained over 20,000 young people across the UK to lead on anti-bullying campaigns in their schools. To support this programme we have recruited a #NeonSquad to inspire other young people with their anti-bullying stories.

Neon Stand Up To Bullying Logos

Meet the Squad

#NEONSQUAD

Ayida

WHAT’S YOUR SECRET SKILL?
Making people laugh when they are feeling down

WHAT HAS BEEN YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGE?
My under bite and overcoming my bullying because of it

HOW WOULD YOUR FRIENDS DESCRIBE YOU?
Funny, loving, sarcastic and kind

WHAT IS THE ONE THING THAT SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOL THAT ISN’T ALREADY?
The effects of bullying and life skills

WHO DO YOU MOST ADMIRE?
Malala Yousafzai

Emma

WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS?
I want to work in the TV/media industry

WHAT WAS YOUR ANTI-BULLYING TURNING POINT?
When I stopped caring about what others thought about me. It lead me on to be more me

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE?
Unique. I don’t go with the ordinary

WHAT IS THE ONE THING THAT SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOL THAT ISN’T ALREADY?
Schools should teach about acceptance and uniqueness and why it’s important

WHERE IN THE WORLD HAVE YOU BEEN THAT YOU THOUGHT WAS PARADISE?
A gaming exhibition in Birmingham. Gaming is my paradise.

Flick

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE GETTING READY SONG?
Elvis – A Little Less Conversation

WHAT WAS YOUR ANTI-BULLYING TURNING POINT?
I was bullied for years, but for ages I thought it was my fault because I was different. When I got my first big role on stage, it increased my confidence and I realised that being unique is not a weakness but the greatest strength

WHAT IS YOUR MOST FAVOURITE PLACE ON EARTH?
Any swimming pool. Being underwater allows me to escape and be myself before returning with more confidence

IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME, WHAT YEAR WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO?
I would either travel to the years before King Alfred the Great and live amongst other pagans, or I would go and convince William Shakespeare to let me perform in one of his plays

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE?
I try to keep up with catwalk trends which tends to mean I stand out in a crowd.

Jennifer

WHAT’S YOUR SECRET SKILL?
Photography

WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS?
Maybe a dancer or choreographer

WHAT WAS YOUR ANTI-BULLYING TURNING POINT?
I wanted to be an anti-bullying ambassador because I didn’t want people to feel the way I did

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST SUCCESS UP UNTIL NOW?
Appearing in a music video and being chosen to be part of the Neon squad

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE?
A girly girl, but I wear what’s on-trend.

Lucy

WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE GETTING READY SONG?
Touch by Little Mix

WHAT WAS YOUR ANTI-BULLYING TURNING POINT?
I have always been involved in some kind of anti-bullying support network. Since I moved up to secondary school I became an anti-bullying ambassador

IF YOU COULD GO BACK IN TIME, WHAT YEAR WOULD YOU TRAVEL TO?
0000 to see how life began

WHAT IS YOUR BIGGEST SUCCESS UP UNTIL NOW?
Creating a pupil-friendly anti-bullying policy which lead us to win the North Lincolnshire Community anti-bullying award

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE?
Fun and glamorous.

Nicole

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR PERSONAL STYLE?
Unique, skater. I love a pair of ripped skinny jeans!

WHAT WAS YOUR ANTI-BULLYING TURNING POINT?
Experiencing cyber-bullying pushed me to the limit and I knew NOBODY, no matter what, deserves to receive hateful messages! It was time to stand up and be the change, not just for me but for others too

WHO DO YOU MOST ADMIRE?
My Mum for never giving up on me, helping me through my worst times and believing in my dreams

WHAT IS THE ONE THING THAT SHOULD BE TAUGHT IN SCHOOL THAT ISN’T ALREADY?
Self-love and building confidence. Young people are still afraid of speaking up

WHAT ARE YOUR CAREER GOALS?
To become a police officer.

Don’t suffer in silence – whether it’s happening in school, online or outside of school, make sure you talk to a trusted adult about what’s going on. This can be your form tutor, teacher, a parent or relative you trust. You could also speak to a parent or guardian, or get support from a support service such as UK or Irish Childline.

Save the evidence - Keep a record of what’s been going on – remember the 4 W’s: What, Where, When and Who. This will help the person helping you to understand the situation and help you to resolve it. If the bullying is taking place online, save screenshots as evidence.

Block and report – if you are experiencing cyberbullying, most social media platforms will have the option to block the person or group cyberbullying you and report the messages.

Stay positive - Although it may feel like you do not have control of the situation, you can. Make sure you do the steps above and talk to people inside and outside of school that you can trust. These people care for you and will work with you to stop the cyberbullying. Stay positive, you are not alone and things will get better.

More information:

www.antibullyingpro.com

www.NSPCC.org.uk

People with high self-esteem will generally have a positive view of themselves, will forgive themselves for making mistakes and not let setbacks have a long-term negative impact on how they view themselves. A person suffering from low self-esteem will often have negative beliefs about themselves. They might focus on what they think are their weaknesses and mistakes they’ve made and find it difficult to deal with failure or make new friends.

TOP TIPS FOR HELPING YOU WITH YOUR BODY CONFIDENCE & SELF-ESTEEM

Firstly, recognise that you’re not alone! Self-esteem and body confidence issues affect us all in one way or another in our lives. Self-esteem isn’t something that’s fixed in place – it varies and we all have some days where we feel on top of the world and some days where we don’t feel so great.

With the rise of social media, selfies and celebrity culture, it can often seem like society places a high value on appearance. But you are unique and your self is about more than just your selfie.

If you are ever made to feel bad about the way you look, remember that one size doesn’t fit all. There’s no change that you could make to your appearance which would make you ‘perfect’, because ‘perfection’ doesn’t exist. You have a unique combination of strengths, positive qualities, interests, characteristics and something positive to offer.

Focus on the things you like about yourself and remind yourself of those positive qualities every day. You could even write positive affirmations on a Post-It note and stick these somewhere you look every day, like your school planner or mirror. Your brain is very powerful and regularly reminding yourself of your positives will help train your brain to drown out negative thoughts.

Mental health charity Mind has these top tips to help you build your self-esteem, with lots more information available on each one on their website:

  • Do activities that you enjoy
  • Spend time with positive, supportive people
  • Be helpful and considerate to others
  • Try not to compare yourself to other people
  • Try to do regular exercise, eat healthily and get enough sleep
  • Be assertive, don’t let people treat you with a lack of respect
  • Use self-help books and websites to develop helpful skills, like assertiveness or mindfulness
  • Learn to challenge your negative beliefs
  • Acknowledge your positive qualities and things you are good at
  • Self-talk - get into the habit of thinking and saying positive things about yourself

USEFUL LINKS

Beat

The UK’s leading charity supporting anyone affected by eating disorders or difficulties with food, weight and shape.

www.b-eat.co.uk

Body Gossip

A campaign which explores people’s experiences of body confidence

www.bodygossip.org

Changing Faces

A charity for people and families who are living with conditions, marks or scars that affect their appearance.

www.changingfaces.org.uk

Mind

The UK’s leading mental health charity

www.mind.org.uk

Racial and religious bullying is where the motive for the person bullying is due to the victim's skin colour, ethnicity, religion, way of talking or cultural practices.

TOP TIPS FOR DEALING WITH THE ISSUE:

Racial and religious bullying is unacceptable. No one has the right to treat you differently because of your racial or religious characteristics.

  • Tell someone - Don’t suffer in silence and reach out to someone in your support network. Someone you trust, such as a close friend, family member, or teacher, will be able to listen and offer you support. Online support services are also a great source of information.
  • Stay safe - If you’re worried about racial and religious bullying in the playground or walking home from school, you could hang around with people you know and trust. If the bullying is taking place online you can change your privacy setting or mute, block, or report the perpetrators.
  • Gather evidence - You should always write down who has been saying what to you, the date, time and location this has taken place, and save/screenshot any messages received online.
  • Accept that it's not your fault - When you’re going through a difficult time it might be hard to accept this, but it’s important to remember that you haven’t caused the bullying. Remember to reach out to someone you trust who can support you.

More information:

www.antibullyingpro.com

www.NSPCC.org.uk

Coming to terms with your sexuality or gender identity can be hard, and it’s not very nice when people bully or make fun of you because of it. It’s very important to remember that regardless of what sexuality or gender identity you define as, it is normal and you should be proud of who you are.

Homophobic and biphobic bullying – Homophobic and biphobic bullying is behaviour or language that makes a person feel upset, uncomfortable or unsafe because of their sexuality or perceived sexuality.

Transphobic Bullying – Transphobic bullying is behaviour or language that makes a person feel upset, uncomfortable or unsafe because of what gender they identify as.

TIPS FOR DEALING WITH THE ISSUE

If you identify as part of the LGBT+ community, you have the right to feel safe in school, college, community or workplace. If you are experiencing bullying because of your sexuality or gender identity you can:

  • Don’t suffer in silence! Talk to a trusted adult such as a teacher, youth worker or your HR department about the comments being made and how they are impacting you. It’s important to keep a diary of any comments that have taken place, so you’re able to show examples. Once you have spoken about the issues, it’s important to decide a plan of action going forward that you’re comfortable with.
  • Challenge behaviour- if you overhear comments and you feel comfortable and safe to, you could explain to the person that their comments are hurtful and ask them to refrain from saying them in the future.
  • If you’re not happy with the way your school, college, university or workplace have dealt with incidents you have reported, you can report it to the police as a hate crime.

More information:

www.antibullyingpro.com

www.NSPCC.org.uk

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